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Fish, Fishers, and Fisheries: Data Needs for a Changing Climate
Fish, Fishers, and Fisheries: Data Needs for a Changing Climate
WhenThursday, Feb. 16, 2017, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Description

Fish, Fishers, and Fisheries: Data Needs for a Changing Climate
Alistair Hobday, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Oceans and Atmosphere

Fish and fishers are already responding to climate-related changes in the ocean, particularly in fast warming ocean regions. However, past experience is becoming less valuable for managers in managing these changes, as conditions are falling outside the historical range. Fortunately, fish, fishers and fisheries can and do adapt to change, provided suitable options exist. A range of methods can inform prioritization, and then development of adaptation options. In Australia, as elsewhere, implementation is a limiting factor and management will need to rapidly adapt to ensure sustainable fish and fisheries into the future.
Dr. Alistair Hobday is a Senior Principal Research Scientist with CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere. His current research focuses on investigating the impacts of climate change on marine biodiversity and fishery resources, and developing, prioritising and testing adaptation options to underpin sustainable use and conservation into the future. He co-developed the Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fisheries (ERAEF) approach to risk-based management for fisheries, which has been applied in more than 15 countries around the world. He is also leading development of seasonal forecasting applications to support decision-making in marine environments.

Campus locationFishery Sciences (FSH)
Campus roomFishery Sciences Auditorium (FSH 102)
Event typesLectures/Seminars
Event sponsorsThe Bevan Series is generously funded by the Donald E. Bevan Endowed Fund in Fisheries, the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and Washington Sea Grant.
Linkfish.uw.edu…
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