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Arctic Indigenous Economies in Inuit Nunangat (Canada) and the Circumpolar World International Policy Institute Arctic Fellows Research Symposium
Arctic Indigenous Economies in Inuit Nunangat (Canada) and the Circumpolar World International Policy Institute Arctic Fellows Research Symposium
WhenFriday, Dec. 9, 2016, 8 – 11:30 a.m.
Description

At this research symposium International Policy Institute (IPI) Arctic Fellows, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (Jackson School), will present their policy papers on the theme of Arctic Indigenous Economies in Inuit Nunangat (Canada) and the Circumpolar World. Following each presentation, a UW expert in the field will provide feedback on the student’s research.

The IPI Arctic Fellows are UW graduate students whose research interests include the Arctic. They represent the Jackson School, School of Law, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, the College of Education, and the Museology program. This fall the IPI Arctic Fellows participated in a seminar on Arctic Indigenous Economies and an all-day-workshop by the same name (sponsored by the Korea Maritime Institute). Over the course of the quarter the IPI Arctic Fellows have explored what it means to the field of international relations that non-nation-state actors – Arctic Indigenous peoples – are increasingly involved in decision shaping for the region. Each Fellow has identified a unique area of research in an effort to bring greater understanding to this phenomenon.

The IPI is funded by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York aimed at improving the transfer of research and expertise between higher education and the policy world in the area of global affairs. One of the key pillars of IPI is to train students to engage more effectively with the international policy and decision-making community.

This symposium was made possible by funding from the International Policy Institute (supported by funding from Carnegie Corporation of New York), Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS); and by the Canadian Studies Center, JSIS (supported by funding from the International and Foreign Language Education Office, U.S. Department of Education).

PROGRAM
8:00-8:15 - Welcome and Overview of Research Projects, by Dr. Nadine C. Fabbi, Lead, International Policy Institute Arctic Fellows, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Climate Change & Resource Management
8:15-8:30 – “The More we Act, the More we Save our Global Air Conditioning – the Arctic,” by Olivier Ndikumana, MA, Applied International Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies - Respondent: Harry Stern, Applied Physics Laboratory

8:30-8:45 – “Arctic Indigenous Voices on Oil Development in Clyde River, Nunavut,” by Brandon Ray, MA student, International Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS) and Marine and Environmental Affairs; Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Center for Global Studies, JSIS, Russian, 2016-17 - Respondent: Tom Leschine, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

8:45-9:00 – “The Spirit of Co-management in Tongait KakKasuangita SilakKijapvinga: Torngat Mountains National Park,” by Elizabeth Wessells, MA, Museology - Respondent: Katie Bunn-Marcuse, Burke Museum

9:00-9:15 – “A Call for Progressive and Inuit-centered Drinking Water and Sanitation Infrastructure in Nunavik,” by Rachel Freeman, MA student, Marine and Environmental Affairs; Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, French, 2016-17 - Respondent: Nives Dolsak, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

Building Community Capacity
9:30-9:45 – “Beyond Ilinniaq: Making Space for Indigenous Knowledge and Traditional Values in Arctic Classrooms,” by Katie Aspen Gavenus,” MA student, Education; Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Inuktitut, 2016-17 - Respondent: Jessica Thompson, College of Education
9:45-10:00 – “A Brief Examination of an Indigenous Northern Education Program: Successes and Challenges Facing Operation Beaver,” by John Simpson, MA, Applied International Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies - Respondent: Margaret Willson, author, Seawomen of Iceland: Survival on the Edge (2016)
10:00-10:15 – “Tirigusuusiit, Maligait, Piquajait: Incorporating Traditional Law into Training for Inuit Lawyers in Canada,” by Malina Dumas, JD student, Law; Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Inuktitut, 2016-17 - Respondent: Robert Anderson, School of Law

Diplomacy and International Relations
10:15-10:30 – “Future of Recent Past: Annie Pootoogook Reclaims (Inuit) Visual Sovereignty,” by Lucy Kruesel, MA student, Education (Native education focus - Respondent: Manish Chalana, Department of Urban Planning and Design

10:30-10:45 – “Approaches to Arctic Indigenous Businesses,” Jay-Kwon Park, MA student, International Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies,— Respondent: Scott Montgomery, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

10:45-11:00 – “Nunarjuarmiunguqatigiit: People-to–people Diplomacy as it Pertains to the Arctic,” by Elena Bell, PhD student, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Inuktitut, 2016-17 - Respondent: Don Hellmann, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

11:00-11:15 – Wrap up: Vincent Gallucci, Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Nadine Fabbi

11:30 – Lunch!

Campus locationThomson Hall (THO)
Campus room317
Event typesAcademics
Event sponsorsInternational Policy Institute, Arctic Initiative, and the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
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