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"Re-envisioning Criminal Justice" - Part of the 10TH ANNIVERSARY SYMPOSIUM
WhenThursday, May 23, 2019, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Campus locationThomson Hall (THO)
Campus roomRoom 317
Event typesSpecial Events
Event sponsorsSponsored by the Henry M. Jackson Foundation
Co-sponsored by: Center for Global Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Description

10TH ANNIVERSARY SYMPOSIUM: Celebrating 10 Years of Education for Transformation

Every year since our inception, the Center for Human Rights has hosted a spring celebration designed around the general theme of “celebrating human rights in our communities.” We selected this theme specifically to highlight good news and local leadership, as important counterpoints in a field that is dominated by bad news and in which it is often assumed that the East Coast leads the way. For our tenth-year celebration, we will be lifting up the leadership we have nurtured by involving our students in innovative research partnerships. This is the heart of the UWCHR model.

We will host an all-day conference that brings several of our most illustrious graduates back to campus to share the innovative work they are doing now in careers partially launched by experiences at UWCHR. Each graduate will appear on a panel alongside current students or staff, thus highlighting the ongoing research work and the directions former students have taken beyond our campus. The day’s events will culminate in a reception and evening panel that looks ahead to the next decade in human rights.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. REGISTER  HERE.
Registration closes 9:00 am on 5/23

Thursday, May 23, 2019
12:30 - 1:30 pm
"Re-envisioning Criminal Justice"
Thomson Hall, Room 317
Lunch provided
Speakers:

  • Satory Adams (UW undergraduate, Community Justice Intern at Public Defender Association)
  • Phil Neff (UWCHR Project Coordinator)
  • Francisca Gomez Baeza (UWCHR Graduate Research Fellow)

Satory Adams is currently a student at the University of Washington studying Law, Societies & Justice and Communications. Ms. Adams shares that her educational experience at the University of Washington has helped her build a knowledgeable foundation for addressing issues of injustice. “Prior to my attendance at the University of Washington, I always had a passion for criminal justice reform due to my personal experience of having a parent incarcerated. I firmly believe in the idea that people are not disposable, which has led me to some of the restorative justice work I am involved in at the Community Justice Project.” After graduation, Satory hopes to continue doing meaningful restorative justice work in the community and also explore opportunities that involve working with children with incarcerated parents.

Phil Neff is Project Coordinator for the University of Washington Center for Human Rights. A UW alumnus (English & Human Rights, ’07), Phil served as an international accompanier of human rights defenders with the Guatemala Accompaniment Project of the Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala in 2008, later coordinating the project from 2010-2012, including during legal proceedings for the Dos Erres massacre and the Maya-Ixil genocide case; he has served on the volunteer board of NISGUA since 2016.  At UWCHR, Phil has managed research and communications for Unfinished Sentences, the Center’s project supporting survivors of war crimes in El Salvador; and the Human Rights at Home initiative, which works alongside local immigrant rights organizations to monitor impacts of immigration enforcement in Washington State. Phil has taken the lead on expanding the Center’s data science capacity through a partnership with the Human Rights Data Analysis Group.

Francisca Gómez Baeza joined the Center for Human Rights in September 2018. She is part of the project ‘Human Rights at Home’, where is responsible for the quantitative analysis of Department of Justice data. She holds a B.S in Psychology, a Master in Public Policy, and since 2016 is a graduate student at UW Sociology. Her work has always been related to the criminal justice system. As a therapist at a detention center, as policy maker, and as teacher and researcher. Her research interests are punishment, social control, data science, and human rights. Currently, she is interested in both the positive uses of digital data for human rights purposes, and the harmful uses of this sources of information, particularly from law enforcement institutions. Francisca is from Chile. She was born during the dictatorship. She is first generation earning a college degree, and first generation of financially independent women.


Additionally, we will offer a free, public "FOIA" workshop the day before the conference.

See full program below:
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

3:30 - 5:30 pm
“How to file a FOIA” Workshop
Thomson Hall, Room 317
Facilitator: Emily Willard (Graduate Research Fellow)

Thursday, May 23, 2019

9:30 - 10:30 am
"Researching Migrant Rights"
Thomson Hall, Room 317
Breakfast provided
Speakers:

  • Noah Schramm (UW Alumnus, Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project)
  • Simon Fox (UW Alumnus, independent filmmaker)
  • Grace Sorensen (UWCHR Undergraduate Research Fellow)

12:30 - 1:30 pm
"Re-envisioning Criminal Justice"
Thomson Hall, Room 317
Lunch provided
Speakers:
  • Satory Adams (UW undergraduate, Community Justice Intern at Public Defender Association)
  • Phil Neff (UWCHR Project Coordinator)
  • Francisca Gomez Baeza (UWCHR Graduate Research Fellow)

Main Event
5:30 - 6:30 pm - Reception
6:30 - 8:00 pm - Remarks, Student Awards, Justice Awards, Student and Alumni Panel
Panelists:

  • Mina Manuchehri (UW Alumna, Attorney and Land Tenure Specialist at Landesa)
  • Alex Montalvo (UW Alumnus, independent filmmaker)
  • Emily Willard (UWCHR Graduate Research Fellow)
  • Grace Sorensen (UWCHR Undergraduate Research Fellow)

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